Prof shoots time-lapse video of Arts and Humanities Building

Jeff Haberl

Jeff Haberl

Hongyun Zhou

Hongyun Zhou

Beam-by-beam construction progress of the Arts and Humanities Building at Texas A&M was captured by Jeff Haberl, professor of architecture at Texas A&M, who photographed the construction site once a week from a perch on the fourth floor of Langford Architecture Center building A.

Hongyun Zhou, a Master of Architecture student, aligned the photos for a smooth time-lapse slide show of the five-story, 120,000 square-foot building’s construction, which began in the spring 2011 semester and was completed in December 2012.

The new building forms a quadrangle with Langford A (1977), the Williams Administration Building (1932) and the David G. Eller Oceanography and Meteorology Building (1972), providing a park-like public space.

Home to the departments of performance studies and English in the College of Liberal Arts, it’s the first campus building designed specifically for instruction and scholarship in the arts and humanities.

With a dozen practice rooms, a black box theatre, computer-based teaching classrooms, recording studios and office space, the building is expected to enhance interdisciplinary scholarship and creative work on campus.

An outdoor courtyard contains a performance area with electrical access.

Designed to meet the Leadership in Engineering and Environmental Design (LEED) “silver” rating, the building has a 20,000 gallon underground cistern to collect rainwater and air conditioning condensation to irrigate its surrounding green space. Its nontoxic carpets are made of materials that prevent off-gassing, the release of chemicals into the air through evaporation.

posted January 30, 2013